Forthcoming Events

07.06.2022 - 10.06.2022, Grindelwald, Switzerland
20.06.2022 - 23.06.2022, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
27.06.2022 - 29.06.2022, University College London, UK

News

New scientific highlight- by MUST PI Richardson
FELs of Europe prize for Jeremy Rouxel- “Development or innovative use of advanced instrumentation in the field of FELs”
Ruth Signorell wins Doron prizefor pioneering contributions to the field of fundamental aerosol science
New FAST-Fellow Uwe Thumm at ETH- lectures on Topics in Femto- and Attosecond Science
International Day of Women and Girls in Science- SSPh asked female scientists about their experiences
New scientific highlight- by MUST PIs Milne, Standfuss and Schertler
EU XFEL Young Scientist Award for Camila Bacellar,beamline scientist and group leader of the Alvra endstation at SwissFEL
Prizes for Giulia Mancini and Rebeca Gomez CastilloICO/IUPAP Young Scientist Prize in Optics & Ernst Haber 2021
Nobel Prize in Chemistry awarded to RESOLV Member Benjamin List- for the development of asymmetric organocatalysis
NCCR MUST at Scientifica 2021- Lightning, organic solar cells, and virtual molecules
#NCCRWomen- NCCR MUST celebrates 50 years women’s right to vote in Switzerland
Kick-Off dynaMENT Mentoring for Women in Natural Sciences- with Ursula Keller as plenary speaker
Four new scientific highlights- by MUST PIs Chergui / Milne / Beaud / Staub, by Wolf / Röthlisberger, by Wörner, and Keller

2D IR spectroscopy of high-pressure phases of ice

October 12, 2017

New experiments and simulations reveal molecular interactions in extreme phases of water ice

Water is everywhere. The water molecule displays enormous structural complexity in its condensed forms including the highly anomalous liquid phase, seventeen crystalline phases of ice, at least two families of amorphous ices, and stacking-disordered ice, which displays crystalline order in only two dimensions. Many of the properties and behaviors of these exotic ices remain mysterious, but Halina Tran and co-workers in the research groups of Peter Hamm, and at University College London and the University of Groningen recently provided new understanding. They analyzed how water molecules interact with one another in three types of ice and found the interactions depended strongly on the orientation of the molecules and the overall structure of the ice. The researchers describe their results in The Journal of Chemical Physics, from AIP Publishing. 

"The new work has given us spectacular new insights on how water molecules behave when packed in dense and structurally complex environments," said Christoph Salzmann of the University College London. "Ultimately, this knowledge will enable us to understand liquid water as well as water surrounding biomolecules in a much better fashion." Water is, of course, essential for life as we know it. But it's also unique due to its bent molecular shape, with two hydrogen atoms hanging off an oxygen atom at an angle. The overall molecule has an electrical polarity, with positively and negatively charged sides. Because of these properties, water molecules can fit together in a variety of ways when solidifying into ice. As water typically freezes on Earth, the molecules assemble into a lattice with structural units shaped like hexagons. But at extremely high pressures and low temperatures, the molecules can arrange themselves in more complex ways, forming 17 different phases -- some of which may exist on the icy moons of the outer planets. 




Reference: Tran, H., A. V. Cunha, J. J. Shephard, A. Shalit, P. Hamm, T. L. C. Jansen and C. G. Salzmann (2017). 2D IR spectroscopy of high-pressure phases of ice. J. Chem. Phys. 147: 144501 (10.1063/1.4993952) Tran-2017

See the News Item on IAP Publishing

<<
NCCR MUST Office : ETHZ IQE/ULP-HPT H3 | Auguste-Piccard-Hof 1 | 8093 Zurich | E-Mail | +41 44 633 36 02
The National Centres of Competence in Research (NCCR) are a research instrument of the Swiss National Science Foundation
FNSNF