Forthcoming Events

26.03.2018 - 28.03.2018, Hilton Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France
22.04.2018 - 26.04.2018, Strasbourg Convention & Exhibition Centre, France


Thomas Feuer: Vortrag über THz Strahlung (in German)- in der Physikalischen Gesellschaft Zürich (PGZ)
New scientific highlights- by MUST PIs Ursula Keller, Thomas Feuer, Majed Chergui and Hans Jakob Wörner
Peter Hamm selected as the 2018 recipient of the Ellis R. Lippincott Award (OSA)- for seminal contributions to developing multidimensional infrared, Raman and Terahertz spectroscopy
Ursula Keller awarded the IEEE Photonics Award 2018 -for her work as a pioneer in the field of ultrafast lasers
Jean-Pierre Wolf to Receive ZEISS Research Award - for his groundbreaking application of laser pulses in researching the earth’s atmosphere
Three new scientific highlights- by MUST PIs Jean-Pierre Wolf, Majed Chergui / Rafael Abela / Chris Milne and Ursula Keller /Jörg Osterwalder / Matthias Hengsberger
Special Issue of Structural Dynamics on the NCCR MUST- with 10 reviews and 2 perspectives
Majed Chergui elected to the Royal Academy of Sciences of Spain - as successor to Ahmed Zewail (1999 Chemistry Nobel Laureate)
GAP-Biophotonics with Jean-Pierre Wolf-visited by the Grand Conseil of Geneva
First time resolved Pilot Experiment by SwissFEL (30.11.2017): Semiconductor to metal transition in Ti3O5 nanocrystals
ERC Consolidator Grant for Hans Jakob WörnerAttosecond X-ray spectroscopy of liquids ...
ERC Consolidator Grant for Fabrizio CarboneVisualizing the Conformational Dynamics of Proteins ...

An ultrafast X-ray source in a laboratory format

Researchers at ETH Zurich and the University of Geneva have succeeded for the first time in using a laboratory X-ray source to demonstrate how two highly fluorinated molecules change within a few quadrillionths of a second, or femtoseconds.

In nature, some processes occur so quickly that even the blink of an eye is very slow in comparison. Many basic physical, chemical and biological reactions take place on the ultrafast time scale of a few femtoseconds (10−15 s) or even attoseconds (10−18 s). In molecules, elementary particles, such as electrons or photons, move in a mere 100 attoseconds (10−16 s). When electrons in a molecule jump from one atom to another, chemical bonds dissolve and new ones arise within a fraction of a femtosecond. The ability to track processes of this kind on the atomic scale in real time is one of the key reasons for development of major new research facilities such as the SwissFEL free electron laser. Now, researchers from the ETH Zurich and the University of Geneva have found a way to study ultrafast processes of this kind in the laboratory, using a soft X-ray source.

Reference: Pertot, Y., C. Schmidt, M. Matthews, A. Chauvet, M. Huppert, V. Svoboda, A. von Conta, A. Tehlar, D. Baykusheva, J.-P. Wolf and H. J. Wörner (2017). Time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy with a water window high-harmonic source. Science. (10.1126/science.aah6114) Pertot-2017 (1.13 MB)

Also: see our Highlights page

Download Pertot-2017.pdf (1.13 MB)
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