Forthcoming Events

04.12.2018 - 05.12.2018, Adriatico Guesthouse in Grignano, Trieste

News

Nobel Prize in Physics 2018 for groundbreaking inventions: intense ultrafast laser pulses and optical tweezers
Ambizione grant awarded to Elsa Abreu- in Steve Johnson's group
Fabrizio Carbone promoted Associate Professor of Physics- in the EPFL School of Basic Sciences from 1st of August
New scientific highlights- by MUST PIs Ursula Keller, Gebhard Schertler / Jörg Standfuss, Majed Chergui, Peter Hamm
White Paper Photonics Switzerland- presented June 20, 2018 at the Swissmem "Industrietag"
Ursula Keller portrayed in the NZZ -Laserlicht ist das schönste Licht der Welt
Ursula Keller: Nomination for European Inventor Award 2018Ursula Keller is nominated for the Lifetime Achievement Award - VOTE
New scientific highlights- by MUST PIs Ursula Keller, Thomas Feuer, Majed Chergui, Hans Jakob Wörner, Jean-Pierre Wolf and Ursula Röthlisberger
ERC Advanced Grants for Ursula Keller and Ruth Signorell- a major success for women scientists in the NCCR MUST
ETH WPF General Assembly - 28 March 2018Video-conferencing in Zürich and Lausanne

Nobel Prize in Physics 2018

Physics Nobel Prize Winner 2018
The 2018 Nobel Prize in physics has been awarded to three scientists — including one woman — for advancing the science of lasers and creating extremely useful tools out of laser beams. The winners include Arthur Ashkin, 96, a retired American physicist who worked Bell Labs; who won half the prize for optical tweezers, which allow scientists to manipulate microscopic particles (often viruses and bacteria) within a laser beam.

The other winners, Gerard Mourou, 74, now at the École Polytechnique in France and University of Michigan; and Donna Strickland, 59, now at the University of Waterloo in Canada, invented a technology that led to the rapid increase of laser pulse intensity, which has allowed for myriad laser-based tools, including the beams commonly used in laser eye surgery.

Using an ingenious approach, Strickland and Mourou succeeded in creating ultrashort high-intensity laser pulses without destroying the amplifying material. First they stretched the laser pulses in time to reduce their peak power, then amplified them, and finally compressed them. If a pulse is compressed in time and becomes shorter, then more light is packed together in the same tiny space – the intensity of the pulse increases dramatically. Strickland and Mourou’s newly invented technique, called chirped pulse amplification, CPA, soon became standard for subsequent high-intensity lasers.

CPA is the essential tool that enabled the ultrafast science in the NCCR MUST. The 2018 Nobel Prize in Physics recognizes the importance of this field for scientific research and industry.


Download Nobel Prize Press Release (153 KB)
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